What To Do When Your Child Says Something Embarrassing

It happens to all of us. What do you do when your innocent kids says something horrifying to a stranger, friend, or family member? How do you recover with grace and kindness? Learn how to teach your child what they can say and what they should keep to themselves.

We All Know The Scenario

“Well hello, aren’t you adorable! How old are you?”

“I’m three. Do you have a baby in your tummy?”

The 50-year-old man looks at you and chuckles uncomfortably. Meanwhile, you melt into a puddle on the floor.

Kids Say The Darndest Things

If you have kids, I guarantee this has happened or will happen to you at some point. Kids don’t think about people’s feelings before they speak. They just say what’s on their mind. Their innocence is part of what makes them so adorable. So the next time you find yourself in this situation, remember these 3 steps.

How To Handle That Embarrassing Moment

It happens to all of us. What do you do when your innocent kids says something horrifying to a stranger, friend, or family member? How do you recover with grace and kindness? Learn how to teach your child what they can say and what they should keep to themselves.

Step 1: Smile and Take A Deep Breath

Didn’t we just go over how every single parent ever has experienced this moment? That means even that overweight man your child just insulted has very likely been on your side of this situation. Smile at your child’s victim in an apologetic sort of way and take a deep breath. Don’t overreact. Heck, don’t even react. Let the moment slide by and give your cheeks a few seconds to stop burning. Usually, the person your child’s just slammed is every bit as embarrassed as you. No one wants to be called fat, even by a three-year-old.

Step 2: Say Something Nice

You can apologize briefly and quietly if you must, but don’t make a big deal out of it and DON’T force your youngster to apologize. It will only embarrass her and make things more awkward. Instead, I like to change the course of the conversation by offering a genuine compliment or asking a question of the offended person. Something like, “I really like your hat. Is that your team?” This does three things: First, it takes the focus off that awkward, and usually true, thing your kid just said. Second, it provides that poor guy an opportunity to walk away from your encounter with something other than the embarrassment to remember you by. Third, it sets an example for your child about polite conversation starters. So they know. For future reference.

Step 3: Talk About It LATER

After you’ve left the grocery store/barbecue/funeral/etc. and you’re in a place where you and your kid can have a comfortable and genuine face-to-face, bring up the comment. DO NOT attempt to have this conversation if you are still feeling at all embarrassed or upset. Using your I’m-not-mad-this-is-just-a-normal-conversation voice, you can gently explain to your child that we don’t ask people if they have babies in their tummies or say they smell funny or ask if they just farted. Only use this conversation to go over your kid’s current offense. There’s no need to rehash old offenses unless they specifically ask you about them. This can be very simple: “Honey, it’s not polite to ask if someone has a baby in their tummy. Maybe next time you can say/ask…” They’ll have questions. Good Lord, will they have questions. Do your best to answer honestly and completely. “Why? Well, asking if they have a baby means you think their tummy is big and that can sometimes hurt people’s feelings.”

It happens to all of us. What do you do when your innocent kids says something horrifying to a stranger, friend, or family member? How do you recover with grace and kindness? Learn how to teach your child what they can say and what they should keep to themselves.

Remember, Your Child Will Grow Out Of It

Sometimes your kid will come up with more questions and that’s great. Answer as they arise. My daughter went through a phase where she would whisper what she wanted to ask in my ear before saying it out loud (she’s always been a total rule follower). I’d either nod or shake my head and she’d proceed accordingly. These scenarios are super common and don’t have to be a big deal. Most of the time, the people your children talk to are going to be perfectly reasonable adults who’ve been where you’re at and they’ll give you loads of grace. If you run into someone whose feelings genuinely get hurt… well…. they’re a grown-up. I’m not sure it’s your job to help them work through that.

Things You Should NOT Do:

  • Don’t make a scene by yelling at or hitting your child because of their comment and don’t embarrass them in order to show them how it feels. That’s just mean.
  • Don’t force them to apologize for their innocent words
  • Don’t try to explain away your child’s actions to the other person. This only keeps the awkwardness going.
  • Don’t run away. Stick around and show your child how grown-ups interact.
  • Don’t discipline your child for their comment, at least not the first three times. If they keep saying rude things despite knowing very well that it’s not okay, well then…
  • Don’t try to deal with the situation while you’re embarrassed. Wait until you get some separation and perspective to talk about it. I promise you will laugh it off eventually.

Forgive and Don’t Forget

Kids are great because they’re kids. Let them be little, for this time is so very short. Forgive them easily. I promise they don’t mean to embarrass you or others, they’re just genuinely curious about literally everything. The fact that your child feels comfortable enough to ask a stranger if they’re pregnant is a sign that he’s developing well. And don’t you forget this moment (not that it’s likely to happen) because someday the one gaining a few pounds or trying to quietly relieve some bloaty pressure may be you. And it will be up to you to laugh it off and smile knowingly at that young beet-red mama.

Care to share your stories? It’s always great to know we’re not alone in this Mama journey. Share with us in the comments!

Blessings,
Jessi

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