Is It More Than The Baby Blues?

The baby blues are an expected dip in hormone levels responsible for tears, loneliness, and a general blah feeling after the birth of your new baby. But what if those feelings persist weeks and months longer? How do you know whether it's just baby blues or if you might be dealing with postpartum depression? Find out more now. Don't survive in silence any longer.

Every pregnant woman is told to expect the ‘baby blues’, the hormonal crash that can last the first 6-8 weeks of your brand new baby’s life. The baby blues are like PMS on overdrive, waves of inexplicable weeping, soul-sucking loneliness, and irrational fear. But what happens when those first 8 weeks pass and you’re still feeling all that yuck? How can you tell when it’s more than just ‘baby blues?’ How do you know when, or if, it’s time to ask for help?

Baby Blues or Postpartum Depression?

After the birth of my second baby (16 months after my first), I found myself in that exact place. I had enough good moments to feel like life was okay… or at least like I wasn’t sinking quite yet. I rode big curling swells of laughter and moments of bliss and then crashed to the bottom of heart aching emptiness and unending pointless tears. I almost never had an answer to my husband’s question of “What’s wrong?” And I couldn’t really talk about it with my mom or my friends because I didn’t know what to say. I didn’t feel depressed. I just felt yucky.

The longer it went on, the more I told myself to snap out of it, to enjoy what I had, to not let these precious baby days pass me by. I got dressed in the morning and pasted a smile on my face, believing if I could just pretend it long enough, it would feel real. But the days turned into months and the months into years and I still felt an aching emptiness where fulfillment and joy should have been. I spent 3 years slogging through that wasteland. I was even a doula, specially trained to recognize postpartum depression (or PPD) in new moms. But I couldn’t see it in myself.

The baby blues are an expected dip in hormone levels responsible for tears, loneliness, and a general blah feeling after the birth of your new baby. But what if those feelings persist weeks and months longer? How do you know whether it's just baby blues or if you might be dealing with postpartum depression? Find out more now. Don't survive in silence any longer.

When It’s Time To Get Help

I wish I’d said something sooner. I wish someone had said something to me sooner. I wish I hadn’t wasted all that time. I wish… I can’t go back and change my story. And now, on this side of my journey, I wouldn’t want to. My journey has given me the voice to share and help other moms like me, moms like you. The answer to the question at the start of this post, “how do you know if you need help?”, is this: If you’re wondering if you need help, you probably need help.

There’s too much going on during those early months of motherhood (whether it’s your first time or your fifth). If you feel at all ‘off’, ask for help. There is no harm in talking to a counselor or therapist. You might be fine. Your therapist will tell you if that’s the case. But you might not be fine, through no fault of your own, and a therapist can help you become fine again so you really can enjoy motherhood.

“If you’re wondering if you need help, you probably need help.”

Need More Direction?

Sometimes you need more than feelings. Especially if your feelings are super confused or if you’ve shut them down in order to deal with less. In that case, this questionnaire is an incredible objective tool for assessing your mental health. Answer these questions honestly and take it with you to your OB or Midwife at your next appointment. I guarantee they’ve got some awesome resources for you. Know why? Because 1 in 5 women deals with PPD. You are not alone. And you have nothing to fear by asking for help.

Believe me, there is more to fear in living with PPD than in getting the help to fight it. You’re worth it, Mama. Your baby is worth it. Reach out today.

Think Your Wife/Friend/Daughter Might Have PPD?

First things first, ask her how you can help. Or better yet, just show up and do what needs doing. Bring her a meal. Wash, fold, and put away her laundry. Do her dishes. She might ask you to hold the baby while she sleeps, but what she won’t ask you is to do the dirty jobs she believes are her responsibility. Take that on for her and then offer her this post or the questionnaire. Let her know you love her first. And stay by her side, even if she snaps at you or pushes you away. She really needs you right now. She just doesn’t know how to say so.

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